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20121218
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
-year sentence. u.s.-backed rain monarchy banned all public demonstrations earlier this year. new figures show the obama administration has conducted more than 200,000 deportations of parents with children who are u.s. citizens over a period of about two years. according to federal data, nearly one-quarter of all deportations from july 1, 2010 to the end of the september for issued for parents with u.s. citizen children. colorlines reports the data appears to dash hopes that new guidelines issued for deportations last year would curb the separation of families by immigration and customs enforcement. the prosecutorial discretion guidelines instruct ice agents to focus on certain immigrants, including those with criminal convictions, and to consider a person's ties to the country and "whether the person has a u.s. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent" when making deportation decisions. a group of new jersey residents who say they're subjected to surprise pre-dawn, immigration rates has reached a settlement of the federal government. most of the plaintiffs were either citizens o
required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform background checks. you can be a three-time convicted felon, a serial domestic abuser, severely mentally ill, or even on a terrorist watch list and still go to a gun show or go on the internet and buy whatever gun you want. the american people want to strengthen their bases to prevent the mentally ill from buying gun. but over a million disqualifying mental health records are still missing from states. 10 states have failed to flag a single person as mentally ill. and 17 states list less than 100 people. miles per hour people want to see assault weapons bans reinstated and large capacity ammunition clps banned to keep dangerous ammunition out of the hands of mad men. let's face it. when you put a 30-round clip in an assault weapon, you are not protecting your home. you are not hunting deer, you are hunting people. we have hid from this fight for too long. for too long we have used politics and the second amendment to cover up
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
remains endemic. toyota will pay a record u.s. fine of $17.4 million for failing to report auto defects quickly and delaying a recall. it's the company's fourth safety-related fine in the past two years. this one involved floor mats that could hold down the gas pedal in some 2010 lexus models. toyota did not admit to any legal violations. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the community continues to mourn its losses in connecticut, resume some routine and consider its own role in a national conversation on what steps should now be taken. ray suarez begins our coverage with this report. >> suarez: a hearse arrived this morning at saint rose of lima catholic church in newtown carrying the body of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors,
: to me, the most irresponsible comment came on tv yesterday by a u.s. senator dianne feinstein who is rushing to resurrect a bill on gun control. the most responsible set of comments came from the n.r.a. which said at the beginning when the events begin unfolding on tv let's wait for all the facts to come in. i'm calling as a former v.a. homeless outreach worker in rest l.a. one third of america's homeless are military veterans. every one of them could be off the street with mental health problems and so forth if the v.a. would process the claims that have been four and a half years delayed. we sue the v.a. in the ninth u.s. circuit court of appeals in may of last year. the government under obama and holder appealed that win before the three justices panel in may of last year to the full court which set aside our victory and veterans are now back to square one with no mental health issues from a v.a. under a former four-star army general who refuses to process our benefits claim. host: ok. here is paul on twitter. my question is how will balm care -- obama care address the shortage
will absolutely do that with amtrak and our partners at the u.s. dot. >> thank you. my time is up. >> any further questions from any members of the committee? seeing none, i'd like to thank each of our witnesses for your testimony today. i ask unanimous consent at the record of today's agreement open until such time as our witnesses have provided answers to any questions that have been submitted to them in writing. and unanimous consent the record remain open for 15 days for additional comments and information submitted by members for which it is to be included in the record of today's hearing. without objection, so ordered. i'd like to thank our witnesses again for your testimony today. and appreciate your working with our legislative challenge here today. seeing members have nothing further to add, the hearing is adjourned. .. 's retiring senator daniel akaka spoke on the senate floor yesterday about the life and career of senator inouye. these remarks are 15 minutes. >> madam president, it is very difficult for me to rise today with a heavy heart, to bid aloha, aloha to my good friend, colleag
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
. in the marine industry, about 30% of the dealers in the u.s. went under during the recession. isn't that extraordinary? but brunswick's dealer remained flat. they held in much better than the competition. they used the economic weakness to take share. plus the company took out $450 million in fixed costs during the downturn to come out even stronger than ever. that's the brunswick we're dealing with today. second, if higher taxes going forward mean there's slightly less demand for motorboats and fishing boats, you know what? i think that could be more than offset by the additional demand created by all those boats that sandy damaged or destroyed. and even before sandy, things were getting better for brunswick. over the last decade, the age of the average powerboat in the water has gone from 15 years old to 21 years old. wow! i thought cars at 11 years was a lot. that means there's a ton of pent-up replacement demand. we saw the same thing happen in the automobile market where the average car on the road got so old that it has led to a new surge. that's what that $15 million car bu
'll talk about it right after the break. >>> a u.s. veteran now being held in a notorious mexican prison chained to his bed. his parents join me live about the fight to free their son. >> i was shattered, i was just shattered. he looked so hopeless. as a mother to see your child look like that and not being able to help him is just, it feels obscene megyn: we are getting new information on the capture of richard engel from nbc news. he's describing how the rebels kept him and his team tide and beat up. they made them choose which one would be shot first and then held mock shootings. we'll ha this in a live report in moment. the president's healthcare overhail was based on a critical net work of state exchanges. an online site that would help you figure out what plan you might be available for and how much it would cost you. all that takes bodies and resources. the states were supposed to do it. but the majority of state are saying they are not going to do it or at a minimum they want to partner with the federal government to do it. so there is a lot more work here for uncle sam than they
created by the federal reserve system and foreign central banks to finance the u.s. trash -- treasury makes it a situation where americans cannot appreciate the fiscal cliff sit. the deficit goes on as if there were no deficits because the banks are printing money to finance it. lou: with the projection that we're looking at a federal reserve balance sheet that will expand by a trail dollars over the course of the -- trillion dollars over the course of the next 12 months. that's significant funding into the monetary system. what do you think? is it a fore gone conclusion we'll see finally, and i'm not encouraging, but saying, finally, the true inflation? >> my own forecast for what it's worth is that the inflation will not really pick up until the unemployment rate falls much closer to 6%. the wages are so much under control that it's made, actually, the working people of america much more competitive with their competitive nations abroad which, i think, will be one of the surprises next year that we may do better next year, even under fiscal cliff arrangements. lou: can we do better
's the state's former attorney general as well as a former prosecutor and u.s. attorney. senator, thanks for being here tonight. >> thank you so much. >> are you confident that democrats will be able to pass meaningful gun legislation? >> i am never confident of anything when it comes to the united states congress or i should say overconfident. but i am confident that we're going to fight for it. because we are at a critical turning point. there is a kind of tectonic movement politically. the ground is shifting on this issue of gun violence protection. this president spoke very eloquently about it at the vigil sunday night. and my colleagues actually have been revisiting their past positions. and i'm confident that we are in a different era when it comes to gun violence prevention. and we've got a real chance of banning assault weapons, stopping high-capacity magazines or clips. mental health intervention, all kinds of measures like that one. >> right. but on top of that and when we see the horrific scenes that has happened in your state and those that have been impacted in a rail way, y
all the employees, whether or not they are members of the union. neil: i mean, not the u.s. are -- i talked to lawyers all the time. i never understand you guys. you are so brilliant. there is an argument to be made that they're not part of the union or could benefit from a government they make, so there might be a stipulation for nonunion union members, do you know what i mean? >> plus break this down and make it simple. neil: i like that. it's very effective. go on. neil: employees had to pay a very small percentage of their income to the unions for representation. as a result of this law, it will no longer be mandatory for employees to make those payments. as a result, the unions will be representing all of the employees, but without necessarily being paid. it will become a voluntary basis, whether or not these employees want to pay a couple of hundred dollars per year. neil: that is exactly right. do you agree? >> i believe -- is all about choice, giving employees and workers a choice. if the unions decide that they want to change the way they handle things, then that is on them.
as the third longest serving member of the u.s. senate in our nation's history. he served as a defender of the people of this country, championing historic charges forceable rights, equal rights for asian americans, african americans, and native hawaiians. it is an incredible understatement to call him an institution. this chamber will never be the same without him. i remember in our childhood in hawaii, hawaii is a diversified place. where i lived, there were many japanese families that live around us. there were many nights i spent sleeping in the homes of japanese families. eating their food, sleeping on the floor. i was really brought up with the japanese families. when the war broke out, i couldn't understand what was happening. there were families that were removed from the community and at that time,but they pursued iy wanted to serve this country as well. this is why in my time in congress, i did focus on trying to help the japanese americans in this country and asians in this country. and to help them achieve what they really aren't. i remember seeking the medal of honor for th
-americans. if i'm a republican, i have a shorter path maybe to become a governor. or a u.s. senator. maybe it is just ambition and not anything else. >> jennifer: all right. donnie fowler, thank you my friend. appreciate you coming in. up next, just because someone is a leader doesn't mean that they exhibit leadership. i'm going to give you my thoughts on that difference right after this. >> jennifer: the now to my point, in june of 1944, around 150,000 brave men were asked to storm the beaches of normandy. at risk to themselves, they accepted the challenge on behalf of their nation and the world. they were heroes. they were leaders. imagine if we had leaders today with as much courage as each of those soldiers had in just one of their fingers. this gun debate and the fiscal cliff and frankly all important and difficult issues demand leaders who are willing to be personally uncomfortable. what are willing to lean into an oncoming storm rather than be blown along with it. the men at normandy risked their lives for what was right.
underway. >>jonathan: the chemical weapons are a major concern for u.s. officials and the state department spokeswoman said that, saying they could fall in the hands of the rebels and they could use them. what do we do about the chemical weapons? >>guest: i am sure that the pentagon is now reviewing all of the contingency operations on the board, so to speak. this is one of the real dangers we have. if the rebels take over, then what? who are among the rebels? al qaeda elements in there? securing those places will be very important. it will take a lot of intelligence analysis. we will have to share that information certainly with the israels, the russians will be very much concerned about it. all countries should be concerned about should the chemical or biological agents end up in the hands of terrorist groups. we are ought at risk. >>jonathan: for skeptical americans, how do we trust what we are told by our own officials? >>guest: well, the bar of skepticism is pretty high for most members. i can tell you, way back in the 80's when i served on the intelligence committee in the senate, i
bill in over 60 years and most substantial reform of u.s. patent law since the 1836 patent act. the lay lee-smith a.i.a. re-establishes the united states patent system as a global standard. over the past year the patent office has worked diligently to implement the provisions of the act to ensure the bill realizes its full potential to promote innovation and create jobs. the bill that we consider today includes several technical corrections and improvements that ensure that the implementation of the bill can proceed efficiently and effectively. the bill is supported by all sectors of our economy from across the united states, including manufacturers, university, technology, pharmaceutical, and biotech companies and innovators. i have also received letters in support from the coalition for 21st century patent reform which represents manufacturers, pharmaceutical, technology, defense companies, and universities. the innovation alliance which represents high-tech companies and license sure, and the b.s.a., the software alliance which represents a range of high technology and software compa
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)